Sunday, October 18, 2015

What do students think of your tech?

Are you asking your students for their perspectives of the programs and technology you provide to enhance learning? This recentpost by Audrey Mullen, a sophomore in California, provides a too-common look into the high school experience in the 21st Century Classroom. I recently had a conversation with a student who was frustrated with a program that adapted the level of questioning based on her success. She had always been the first to complete her work and master concepts, but now the target kept moving higher based on her mastery of concepts. From her perspective, this was creating a more difficult school experience. How frequently do we listen to these student voices and, when we do, are we reflecting on, or even changing, our practices? Are we having conversations with students about the choices we make and why we believe they are appropriate? As we continue to adopt more technology, instructional changes happen at a quicker pace. Involving students in discussions about those changes can help us achieve better results and help us reach our goals.

Cross Posted in the T&L Newsletter

K12 Blueprint Chromebook Resources

If a school is moving to 1:1 and expecting students to use a single device all day, I believe it’s essential that district leaders live with the same device first. In 2012, I began modeling this by using a Chromebook exclusively for my job. After working effectively in this environment, I was confident that students could, as well. In the past year, Chromebooks have become the top device purchased by schools for reasons explained in the new eBook Less Waiting, More Learning with Intel-Based Chromebooks. In addition to this eBook, K-12 Blueprint offers several great resources for “going Chrome,” including a Chromebooks page and a blog where educators such as Alice Keeler and Kyle Pace share their expertise. Learn what it takes to advance to the next level of technology-powered education on K-12 Blueprint from a team of incredible educators. 

Cross-Posted to the K12Blueprint Blog