Friday, October 24, 2008

Post 10/24/2008

  • New findings on the social nature of the brain reveal the need for principals to fashion a school culture of warmth and trust.

    tags: DLC

  • New findings on the social nature of the brain reveal the need for principals to fashion a school culture of warmth and trust.

    tags: DLC

    • Psychologists have known for a century that people do their best when they experience both high motivation and manageable stress; when people are undermotivated or overstressed, their performance suffers.
    • during inspired moments of learning, students experience a potent mix of attention, interest, and good feelings
      • Teachers did their best job and felt most satisfied when they perceived that the school head


        • Led flexibly rather than sticking to needless rules.

        • Let them teach in their own way, holding them accountable for the results.

        • Set challenging but realistic goals for excellence.

        • Valued their efforts, recognizing a job well done.
    • headteachers, data analysis found, could best create such a climate when they were firm but fair and had a “people first, task second” attitude, addressing teachers' personal needs as well as their collective goals.
    • Six Common Leadership Styles





      Visionary. Inspires by articulating a heartfelt, shared goal; routinely gives performance feedback and suggestions for improvement in terms of that goal.



      Coaching. Takes people aside for a talk to learn their personal aspirations; routinely gives feedback in those terms and stretches assignments to move toward those goals.



      Democratic. Knows when to listen and ask for input; gets buy-in and draws on what others know to make better decisions.



      Affiliative. Realizes that having fun together is not a waste of time, but builds emotional capital and harmony.



      Pacesetting. Leads by hard-driving example and expects others to meet the same pace and high performance standards; tends to give Fs, not As.



      Commanding. Gives orders and demands immediate compliance; tends to be coercive.


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

0 comments: