Friday, April 30, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/30/2010

  • The academic achievement gap between poor and non-poor students is well-known. Low-income children consistently fall behind their peers in test scores, graduation rates, college enrollment, and other measures of academic success. Both state and federal policymakers have recently made significant efforts to adopt reforms designed to address this problem. Some reforms have focused on creating high standards of achievement coupled with systems of testing and accountability. Other reforms have focused on improving the quality of education for low-income students by targeting additional financial resources to the school districts that serve them to improve instruction, facilities, and other academic resources. A significant body of research suggests that targeting additional resources to districts serving low-income children can narrow the academic achievement gap between poor and non-poor students.
    This paper reviews and summarizes the results of current research on education funding for low-income children. It examines the findings of researchers and analysts in three areas: the overall relationship between education funding and student performance; recent estimates of the amount of additional funding necessary to narrow the poverty-based academic achievement gap; and specific resource-intensive strategies that have been shown to benefit students in general and low-income students in particular. The most recent, comprehensive studies indicate that school funding and student performance are strongly related. In particular, they find that low-income children can substantially benefit from policies designed to provide additional resources to high-poverty school districts. New research, however, indicates that the amount of additional resources necessary to reduce the achievement gap is significant and may not be reflected in current state funding policies. The research findings are summarized below:

    tags: LowIncome, i3

  • Click on any of the links below to perform a new searchERIC #: EJ794311Title: Educational Sequelae of High School MisbehaviorAuthors: Finn, Jeremy D.; Fish, Reva M.; Scott, Leslie A.Descriptors: High Schools; Behavior Problems; Dropout Rate; Longitudinal Studies; High School Students; Juvenile Gangs; Violence; Grades (Scholastic); Scores; Tests; Graduation Rate; Classroom EnvironmentSource: Journal of Educational Research, v101 n5 p259-274 May-Jun 2008Peer-Reviewed: YesPublisher: Heldref Publications. 1319 Eighteenth Street NW, Washington, DC 20036-1802. Tel: 800-365-9753; Tel: 202-296-6267; Fax: 202-293-6130; e-mail: subscribe@heldref.org; Web site: http://www.heldref.orgPublication Date: 2008-00-00Pages: 16Pub Types: Journal Articles; Reports - EvaluativeAbstract: Despite the fact that misbehavior in school is a pervasive problem to educators and despite its adverse consequences, few researchers have examined the range of misbehaviors by students, their antecedents, or their consequences. The authors used data from the National Education Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS:88) conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to examine immediate and long-term educational sequelae of misbehavior in high school. The authors constructed an extent of serious misconduct (ESM) measure based on classroom and school misbehaviors, ranging from classroom disruption to fighting and gang membership. The authors first examined relationships among specific misbehaviors and the relationship of ESM to student and school demographic characteristics. Second, the authors studied relationships of ESM with high school and post-high school academic outcomes. Misbehavior was related to high school grades, test scores, and graduation and dropout rates. Misbehavior also was related to entering a postsecondary program of study and completing a postsecondary program. In both cases, well-behaved students were more likely to participate in postsecondary education than were moderately misbehaving students, but moderately mis-b

    tags: behavior, i3

  • Educational Sequelae of High School Misbehavior
    Despite the fact that misbehavior in school is a pervasive problem to educators and despite its adverse consequences, few researchers have examined the range of misbehaviors by students, their antecedents, or their consequences. The authors used data from the National Education Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS:88) conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to examine immediate and long-term educational sequelae of misbehavior in high school. The authors constructed an extent of serious misconduct (ESM) measure based on classroom and school misbehaviors, ranging from classroom disruption to fighting and gang membership. The authors first examined relationships among specific misbehaviors and the relationship of ESM to student and school demographic characteristics. Second, the authors studied relationships of ESM with high school and post-high school academic outcomes. Misbehavior was related to high school grades, test scores, and graduation and dropout rates. Misbehavior also was related to entering a postsecondary program of study and completing a postsecondary program. In both cases, well-behaved students were more likely to participate in postsecondary education than were moderately misbehaving students, but moderately misbehaving students did not participate more than did seriously misbehaving students. The authors discussed results in terms of the need to understand more about the structure of school-related misbehavior and the antecedents of misbehavior, including characteristics of classrooms and schools that may exacerbate student misconduct. Keywords: academic outcomes, educational sequelae, high school misbehavior

    tags: behavior, i3


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